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Showing posts from August, 2021

testing prism

testing css .example-gradient { background: -webkit-linear-gradient(left, #cb60b3 0%, #c146a1 50%, #a80077 51%, #db36a4 100%); /* Chrome10+, Safari5.1+ */ background: -moz-linear-gradient(left, #cb60b3 0%, #c146a1 50%, #a80077 51%, #db36a4 100%); /* FF3.6+ */ background: -ms-linear-gradient(left, #cb60b3 0%, #c146a1 50%, #a80077 51%, #db36a4 100%); /* IE10+ */ background: -o-linear-gradient(left, #cb60b3 0%, #c146a1 50%, #a80077 51%, #db36a4 100%); /* Opera 11.10+ */ background: linear-gradient(to right, #cb60b3 0%, #c146a1 50%, #a80077 51%, #db36a4 100%); /* W3C */ } .example-angle { transform: rotate(10deg); } .example-color { color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.2); background: purple; border: 1px solid hsl(100, 70%, 40%); } .example-easing { transition-timing-function: linear; } .example-time { transition-duration: 3s; } Testing bash: #This is programming code for shell script #!/bin/bash

Working with PowerShell & Multiple Azure Contexts

When working with multiple Azure subscriptions, the PowerShell Az.* modules allow for easy context switching. This means that you can run commands agains multiple subscriptions, or you can run commands against subscriptions without changing your default context. An Azure Context object contains information about the Account that was used to sign into Azure, the active (for that context) Azure Subscription, and an auth token cache is not actually empty, it just can't read from here for security reasons, though you can read it with the Get-AzAccessToken command. Here's what is in an Azure Context object: PS> Get-AzContext | fl * Name : TK-PRD (yyyyyyyy-yyyy-yyyy-yyyy-yyyyyyyyyyyy) - tim@timkennedy.net Account : tim@timkennedy.net Environment : AzureCloud Subscription : yyyyyyyy-yyyy-yyyy-yyyy-yyyyyyyyyyyy Tenant : zzzzzzzz-zzzz-zzzz-zzzz-zzzzzzzzzzzz TokenCache : VersionProfile : ExtendedProperties : {} If y