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Showing posts from November, 2010

testing prism

testing css .example-gradient { background: -webkit-linear-gradient(left, #cb60b3 0%, #c146a1 50%, #a80077 51%, #db36a4 100%); /* Chrome10+, Safari5.1+ */ background: -moz-linear-gradient(left, #cb60b3 0%, #c146a1 50%, #a80077 51%, #db36a4 100%); /* FF3.6+ */ background: -ms-linear-gradient(left, #cb60b3 0%, #c146a1 50%, #a80077 51%, #db36a4 100%); /* IE10+ */ background: -o-linear-gradient(left, #cb60b3 0%, #c146a1 50%, #a80077 51%, #db36a4 100%); /* Opera 11.10+ */ background: linear-gradient(to right, #cb60b3 0%, #c146a1 50%, #a80077 51%, #db36a4 100%); /* W3C */ } .example-angle { transform: rotate(10deg); } .example-color { color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.2); background: purple; border: 1px solid hsl(100, 70%, 40%); } .example-easing { transition-timing-function: linear; } .example-time { transition-duration: 3s; } Testing bash: #This is programming code for shell script #!/bin/bash

A generic perl script to scan a CIDR subnet for listeners on a specific port.

Ever had a customer ask you where *some process* was running on *some port* in their network? I have. And usually this involves an environment that doesn't have NMAP installed, or any other common port scanning tools. Fortunately these days, almost every *nix OS comes with Perl, even Solaris. Since I work for a managed services company, and we manage a multitude of different environments, each with it's own set of restrictions and requirements, I try to write the most portable code that I can, so that it has the best chance of actually working in any given environment. This script uses a couple of standard Perl modules that are included as part of the default installation, and don't require any CPAN-Fu, and it takes a couple of options, such as a switch for verbosity, and IP address, with or wirhout a CIDR mask, and a TCP port. The CIDR mask defaults to /32, and the port defaults to 22. Here's an example of the output. tcsh-[101]$ ./scan-port.pl 208.64.63.39/30